Types of Tent

With the British camping season in full swing we thought we’d put together a ‘types of tent guide’ for campers who are eyeing up some new canvas for their break away this summer!

Cost: £ – £££££ (low – high)

Ridge tentThe Ridge Tent

The traditionalist within the camping fraternity, it has a central ridge and is supported by a pole (or tubes) at each end – hence the name. Ridge tents are very withstanding and can vary in size, from a one man right up to a marquee. The main downside of this design is the pitch of the roof and the subsequent lack of head room which, if rain strikes, might test your resolve.

Cost: ££

Image via Flickr

Dome tentThe Dome Tent

The dome tent is arguably the new Ridge tent, that typically uses 2/3 crossing plastic poles that once fed into a webbing strap (within the tent’s inner or outer layer) create a dome/hexagon shape. This shape provides greater head room than a ridge tent and stability is good in small models, however as this design gets larger (4 man +) stability in windy conditions is reduced.

Cost: £

Image via Flickr

The Quick-pitch Tent

The quick-pitch tent is unlikely to evoke nostalgia amongst traditional campers, but they do pop up seriously quickly. This is due to sprung frames built into the fabric of the tent, which with a combination of pressure and twisting collapses the tent into a small circular package. From our experience with these types of tent, they are best used on shorter stays and are perfect for children who want an easy introduction to camping.

Cost: ££

Tunnel tentThe Tunnel Tent

The tunnel tent has proportions similar to a ridge tent – albeit with a modern twist, and an erection process akin to the dome tent. Tunnel tents up-size very well and are perfect for family camping trips.

Cost: £££

Image via Flickr

Geodesic tentThe Geodesic & Semi-Geodesic Tent

Can be described in mathematical terms as the path of minimal curvature, but also the tent of choice for serious expeditions. Both the geodesic & semi-geodesic tent are similar to that of a dome tent, albeit with more elaborately shaped triangular panels. Its shape gives it greater stability over say a tunnel tent, the frame also experiences less movement in higher winds, lowering noise levels.

Cost: ££££

Image via Flickr

Inflatable tentThe Inflatable tent

A similar concept to that of the quick-pitch tent, simply peg down the corners and the rest is largely taken care of. The downside being they are deceptively heavy and rather expensive.

Cost: ££££

Image via Wiki commons

The Vis-a-vis & Pod tent

Not so much a tent, but a design feature that has been incorporated into tent design. This design is characterised by communal living areas with sleeping pods connected from the main area. This design is perfect for family/couples camping as it offers a degree of privacy for all parties and ‘pods’ involved.

Cost: ££

TepeeThe Tepee

Originally from the great plains of North America, the word thípi means ‘to dwell’, however these days the tepee is largely the preserve of a VIP area at a festival. Tepees generally do not have inner linings and cannot be erected as quickly as most of the styles above, so are best suited for the aesthetically conscious fair weather campers.

Cost: £££££

Image via Flickr

YurtThe Yurt

Originally devised by nomads from central Asia, the Yurt has been popularised through the recent rise in glamping and festivals. They look great on any pitch and keep out the elements, perfect for a weekend away in style.

Cost: £££££

Image via Wiki Commons

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